Alcohol addiction in Connecticut is on the rise according to the latest government statistics, which is creating the need for more quality alcohol rehab facilities to be located throughout the state. There are many different forms of alcohol rehabilitation located throughout the state of Connecticut, including inpatient, outpatient, short term and long term, just to name a few. A Connecticut alcohol rehabilitation program must first and foremost, be able meet the personal needs of the individual that is seeking treatment for their alcohol addiction. Once an individual is willing to seek alcohol treatment in Connecticut for their alcohol addiction, no time should be wasted into finding the right alcohol rehabilitation facility. The longer the decision takes, the more time the alcoholic will have to change his mind about being admitted to the alcohol rehab program.

The basic treatment components of a Colorado alcohol treatment center may vary, but the first step is the alcohol detoxification. Alcohol detox can trigger mild to severe withdrawal symptoms and it is recommended that this process be overseen by a professional. After the alcohol detox process is successfully completed, an individual from Connecticut can then begin to focus on the various components of the alcohol rehabilitation program that will help them to master the tools that are necessary to reach their goal of being free from alcohol. The Connecticut alcohol rehab will then begin to administer other components of alcohol treatment that may include counseling, group classes, behavior modification techniques, and drug relapse prevention education. A quality alcohol rehab center will also offer some form of aftercare to support the individual after they have graduated from the alcohol rehabilitation program, and have returned home to Connecticut.


Connecticut alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for Connecticut, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+).It is important to note that the Connecticut drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals in Connecticut who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

515

356

69

320

1983

438

284

65

257

1984

469

306

65

271

1985

448

267

60

236

1986

455

261

57

225

1987

449

270

60

237

1988

484

257

53

223

1989

406

217

53

200

1990

385

217

56

197

1991

310

168

54

142

1992

296

144

49

127

1993

342

152

44

139

1994

310

148

48

128

1995

317

153

48

142

1996

310

152

49

131

1997

339

153

45

133

1998

329

144

44

128

1999

301

136

45

117

2000

341

161

47

140

2001

318

161

51

141

2002

325

144

44

125

2003

294

131

45

114

2004

291

127

44

112

2005

274

120

44

101

2006

301

121

40

109

2007

277

119

43

101

2008

264

104

40

86

2009

223

114

51

99



2003-2004 Connecticut Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.87%

[25th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

14.8%

[27th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

65.3%

[7th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

5.9%

[11th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

127

[35th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.362 per 10,000 people

[45th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

44%

[11th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

60.52%

[4th of 51]

 Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Connecticut?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ are considered legally drunk in Connecticut when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk in Connecticut when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Connecticut, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 are considered legally drunk in Connecticut when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Connecticut

  • First-time DUI offenders in Connecticut must pay a fine of $500 to $1,000. They also face a term of imprisonment of up to six months. Imprisonment, however, can be suspended and a period of probation can be imposed with the condition that the offender perform 100 hours of community service work. The driver's license suspension period is one year.
  • Second-time DUI offenders who are convicted within 10 years of the first offense in Connecticut must pay a fine of $1,000 to $4,000. They also face a prison term of up to two years. At least 120 days must be served. A period of probation is also required. As a condition of probation, second-time offenders in Connecticut must perform 100 hours of community service work. The driver's license suspension period is either three years or one year followed by two years with an ignition interlock device.
  • Those convicted of a third or subsequent DUI within 10 years of a prior conviction in Connecticut must pay a fine of $2,000 to $8,000. They also face a prison term of up to three years. At least one year must be served. A period of probation is also required. As a condition of probation, these offenders must perform 100 hours of community service work. On the third conviction in Connecticut, the offender's driver's license will be permanently revoked.

Ignition Interlock

Any person who has been arrested for DUI in Connecticut may be ordered by a judge to not operate a motor vehicle unless it is equipped with an ignition interlock device. An ignition interlock order may be made as a condition of the offender's release on bail, as a condition of probation, or as a condition of granting the offender's application for participation in a pretrial Connecticut alcohol education system.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Connecticut's DUI laws, a person who holds a commercial driver's license who is convicted of DUI in Connecticut for the first time while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. If a commercial driver commits a second DUI in Connecticut while driving any vehicle, the offender will lose his or her commercial license for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of at least 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

Any driver who commits a DUI in Connecticut, regardless of age, is subject to the same penalties. The only exception is for drivers under 21 who commit a second offense. In that case, the driver's license suspension period is three years or until the offender turns 21, whichever period is longer.

What is Connecticut's Dram Shop Act?

A drinking establishment in Connecticut that sells liquor to an intoxicated person who injures another person because of the intoxication is subject to pay up to $250,000 in damages to the injured person, so long as the injured person gives written notice to the establishment of his or her intention to sue within 120 days of the injury. The notice must specify the time, date, and the person to whom the sale was made; the name and address of the person injured; and the time, date, and place where the injury occurred. Suit must then be filed within one year from the date of the act complained of. Connecticut's Dram Shop Act states that there is no cause of action against a seller of alcoholic beverages for negligence in the sale of liquor to person 21 or older.

Criminal Penalties in Connecticut for Selling Alcohol to a Minor, an Intoxicated Person, or any Habitual Drunkard

A drinking establishment in Connecticut that sells alcohol to a minor, an intoxicated person, or any habitual drunkard is subject to imprisonment of up to one, a fine of up to $1,000, or both. Additionally, anyone who sells liquor to a minor by any means, including the Internet, is subject to imprisonment of up to 18 months, a fine of up to $1,500, or both.

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  • Facts
  • The cost of the majority of alcohol related disease in the United States is publicly funded by tax payers through government insurance policies like Medicaid.
  • What does it mean to get drunk? Getting drunk or intoxicated is the result of consuming excessive amounts of alcohol. Binge drinking typically results in acute intoxication.
  • According to the findings of a recent government survey, despite the numerous widespread warnings about the potential risk of drinking alcohol during pregnancy, over fifteen percent of the pregnant women that were surveyed said they had drunk alcohol at least once during their pregnancies.
  • On one college campus that is located in the northern region of the United States, an informal survey indicated over 90% of first-year students had drunk to intoxication in the previous month.